TRAVEL

SEDONA: RED ROCKS, L'AUBERGE, AND TIBETAN MONKS

The secret is out! Sedona boasts one of the top getaways, not just in Arizona, but in the nation. Visitors to this red rocked paradise will not be disappointed with the large array of outdoor adventure, fine dining, and resorts that this small but lively city has to offer. Just this last week I had the privilege of staying an evening with some very talented photographers and filmmakers at one of Sedona's top resorts, L'auberge. 

L'auberge is one of Sedona's finest resorts. Nestled just above Oak Creek and hidden by the surrounding oak, L'auberge boasts some of the finest dining to be had in all of Sedona. Guests will be delighted by a fantastic staff, beatiful hidden cottages, spa, outdoor activites, and the overall aura of tranquility.

L'auberge is one of Sedona's finest resorts. Nestled just above Oak Creek and hidden by the surrounding oak, L'auberge boasts some of the finest dining to be had in all of Sedona. Guests will be delighted by a fantastic staff, beatiful hidden cottages, spa, outdoor activites, and the overall aura of tranquility.

While at L'auberge guests can sneak away to enjoy the red rocked landscapes and trail systems by horse, bike, ATV, or hike. There's no shortage of things to do!

While at L'auberge guests can sneak away to enjoy the red rocked landscapes and trail systems by horse, bike, ATV, or hike. There's no shortage of things to do!

At L'auberge I was able to witness the extraordinary talent and concentration of five Tibetan Monks who are on a two year tour of America. The monks were working on what is called a ''mandala," an incredibly detailed and elaborate sand painting that is created over a week. With intense concentration the monks worked six to eight hours a day creating their masterpiece. At the end of the week, the mandala was finished - and with such lively and exuberant color! 

Tibetan Monks hard at work on their mandala as they reach their completion.

Tibetan Monks hard at work on their mandala as they reach their completion.

 

At the closing ceremony the monks took the time to celebrate those that had hosted them, and spoke more about the meaning and purpose of the mandala that they had created. To keep in line with the discipline of non-permanence, the mandala was swept away. Some of the remaining sand was given to all that were present, and some was sprinkled into Oak Creek to promote blessing and healing for the land.

The remaining sand is sprinkled into the creek to promote blessing and healing.

The remaining sand is sprinkled into the creek to promote blessing and healing.